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SCOTTISH EXHIBITION BUDGERIGARS & FRIENDS


FOR ALL THINGS BUDGERIGAR

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Forum Home > General Discussion > It all starts with the egg

william peacock
Member
Posts: 180

Naturally it all starts with the egg, but how much should eggs be handled if at all? this topic is contually being debated around the globe and crops up in every other article regarding birds.

Most fanciers, I would assume, do handle budgerigar eggs at some point whether marking them as they're  laid or moving to another nestbox etc.in which case rule one, must be warm hands, and clean hands,common sense tells you fingers tainted by onion, garlic, or tobacco, is trouble.Fertile eggs at their early stage of developement are at their most delicate period when the embryo is just starting to form and is attatched either end by the chalazae( strands of tissue)

a sharp jolt at this stage can cease further developement, I well recall visiting a breeder I had thought quite experienced whilst having just bemoaned the fact he was suffering dead in shell proceeded to literally roll a cluch of eggs off his hand onto the concave ( dead in shell problem solved!)

Do you assist a chick from the egg? or not? this is a critical question encountered by most breeders at some point. My opinion would be,in the case of beginers, or newcomers no, let nature take it's course, but I have once or twice in a season helped release a youngster from it's shell, I do mark my eggs as they are laid, so if a fertile egg fails to hatch at say twenty days I consider assisting,firstly I'll float the egg in a glass of luke warm water using my tougue to test the temperature if the chick is about ready to hatch the egg will twich with vigour on the surface, often this floating of the egg will be enough to coax the youngster out, so I place the egg back to the concave, if by following day and no hatching I generally help a little, the best tool I've found is a very fine dremel saw blade, this is similar to a fine fretsaw blade, holding the egg firmly over a soft covered surface gently grate the egg where signs of piping are generally visible a small dark patch,if a portion of the shell the size of a pinhead is made  usually this allows the chick to break away the shell  itself when returned to the nest.

if not gently pick away with a cocktail stick completely and the chick will do the rest. I should have mentioned before always return eggs same position and same way up when replacing.   Willie P.





     

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March 17, 2010 at 10:03 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Duncan Kean
Member
Posts: 24

Good points Willie, i rarely handle eggs, the only time i did was to transfer eggs to foster parents as the hen was not feeding chicks that had already hatched and therefore died. I candle my eggs with a bendy torch. What i did find though was one of my hens scattered her eggs all over the place when i was checking the nest box ( once every two days ), and in doing so addled the eggs-no problems with other hens doing this, thankfully.

March 17, 2010 at 3:23 PM Flag Quote & Reply

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